Episode 15 | Kathryn Hume on AI, 17th Century French Philosophy, and Intellectual Curiosity

Kathryn Hume is a technologist and philosopher. She’s the VP of Product at integrate.ai, Venture Partner at ffVC, and writer at Quam Proxime. If you’re nerdy enough, she’ll talk about her PhD research on the 17th and 18th century version of “fake it till you make it” which she does here (score!). In this episode we talk about 17th century French philosophy, artificial intelligence (AI) and its implications for ethics and public policy,  the role of the technologist, and more.   Continue reading “Episode 15 | Kathryn Hume on AI, 17th Century French Philosophy, and Intellectual Curiosity”

Episode 10 | David Akinin is helping urbanize Namibia

This week’s guest, David Akinin, spoke to me from Namibia, where he has boldly embarked on the mission to help urbanization. Unlike the mindset of foreign intervention, aid, or charity, David’s motive is to satisfy customers (small as the promises might be) and deliver good returns for his investors. (The token reference to Namibia if you’re struggling with your geography:  this.)

David’s journey from banking in Venezuela to America, France, Switzerland, Chile, and Namibia is breathtaking, and I found myself reflecting on what he said in passing, about being one of 3,000+ students in a classroom:

And that’s what we are… just a number, until we make something out of it.

I also thought that David’s story about the intern that didn’t get the job because an analyst thought that the intern’s habit of touching his chair was an invasion of his private space is important as it is unfortunate. When foreign students look at US internships that don’t translate to full time jobs, cultural norms may well be at play. Still, as David says

We don’t lose out on the opportunities that are in front of us; we lose out on the opportunities that we do not create for ourselves.

Continue reading “Episode 10 | David Akinin is helping urbanize Namibia”

Episode 8 | Caitlin Tulloch evaluates the effectiveness of policy interventions

Caitlin Tulloch is a policy economist at the International Rescue Committee where she studies the cost effectiveness of policy intervention. It’s the sort of thing that wouldn’t initially seem to be, but actually is, novel in the area of humanitarian interventions. Caitlin’s background and work experience at JPAL also provides very useful context and understanding of the multiple “schools of thought” when it comes to development economics.

Show notes: Continue reading “Episode 8 | Caitlin Tulloch evaluates the effectiveness of policy interventions”